accessibility help | a-z site map

SEND INFORMATION

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)

At Mount Pleasant, we make every effort to meet the needs of all our learners, whether those needs are physical, social and emotional or about learning.

All children in our school have support within lessons through high quality teaching and support in appropriate to their needs. This means that all activities, both inside and outside the classroom, are planned according to the level the child is working at. This can include changes to the physical environment, changes to teaching styles and different levels of support which may be offered by adults in the classroom.

We maintain high expectations for all pupils and expect progress to be made by every child regardless of any difficulties. Our school works closely to our SEN Policy, which can be found on our Policies page, and our Equality Plan included in our SEN Report which can be read below:

Did You Know That

We have a Safeguarding Committee which meets at least every half term to discuss and agree how we use our resources to ensure that children’s needs are met and that we are following our policies.

  • We have a named Governor for Special Needs; Mrs H Morris.
  • We have a named Governor for Child Protection; Mrs A Perry.
  • We have a named Governors for Looked After Children/In Care; Mrs J Goode.
  • Mrs Woodhall, our Special Educational Needs and Disability Co-Ordinator (SENDCO) is a trained teacher and assessor for dyslexia. She can offer advice on any concerns that parents may have about their child. Drop-In Sessions: Friday mornings 9.00 to 9.30am.
  • Mrs Jones is a trained provider for the parents in Partnership Programme and can offer support, advice and training for all parents and carers to support dealing with children at home. Drop-In Sessions: Monday mornings 9.00 to 9.30am.
  • Mrs Webster can offer advice about speech and language development concerns.

The following are the four main categories of Special Educational Needs; they act as a guide but the things we do may vary as the actual support plan offered is based on each individual child’s specific needs, which may be complex:

Learning, Thinking and Understanding

Types of need and what that could look like Examples of support available in our school How we check it is working

Children and young people who find learning, thinking and understanding harder than most other pupils may demonstrate the following;

Have difficulty remembering and following a set of instructions.

Take longer to acquire age-appropriate knowledge, skills and understanding.

Find it difficult to remember things such as number bonds, and times tables.

Find it hard to understand how to use letter sounds to read and spell words.

Some children have difficulty with the formation of numbers or letters and with basic spellings. This is a normal part of the early learning process. However, in more extreme cases, or where the child continues to demonstrate these difficulties beyond Year 2, we may decide to assess a child for a specific learning difficulty such as dyslexia.

Teachers adapt what they are teaching or the way they teach to help the child access learning.

Speak with the child and parents about their concerns and discuss realistic expectations.

Extra support is given in a small group or 1:1 by an adult to help the child learn things that they are finding particularly difficult.

Individual targets are set to show what the child needs specific help with.

Access to specialist support from a teacher or other professional.

In extreme cases, referrals to an Educational Psychologist for further support and advice.

The use of accelerated learning programmes such as Reading recovery.

A Learning Support Assessment carried out by Mrs Woodhall to determine the child’s greater specific needs.

Monitor the child’s progress.

Monitor the impact of any interventions being used by talking with and observing the adults who work with the child.

Talk to parents for their views.

Talk to the child for their views.

Discuss with Governors and other staff to determine the best and most effective approach to use for the child.

Ask for the professional who work with the child to regularly check on the child’s progress by carrying out further assessments.

Social, Emotional and Mental Health Difficulties

Types of need and what that could look like Examples of support available in our school How we check it is working

Children and young people who find it difficult to manage their emotions and behaviour in a way that affects their daily life, may demonstrate the following;

Difficulty following rules set by others.

Difficulty siting still for a long time.

Difficulty in listening to and following instructions.

Difficulty in understanding and expressing how they are feeling.

Difficulty making friends.

Difficulty taking responsibility for the things they do.

Over-reacting to generally insignificant instances, either by shouting or having a ‘temper -tantrum’, or harming themselves, property or other people.

The overall ethos of the school is calm and helps to promote excellent behaviour and in turn supports mental health and well-being.

Pupils are encouraged to attend extra-curricular activities so that they meet and interact with other children in a structured way, as widely as possible.

In more extreme cases we seek advice from professional and specialist staff trained in school.

Extra support may be given in a small group or 1:1 to help the child learn how to deal with general issues that may affect them, eg Nurture Group.

Extra support can be given by a designated adult, who the child nominates to work with them, eg Pastoral Support.

Personalised Social Stories are used to support appropriate behaviours and responses.

Referrals to the school Counsellor.

Referrals to appropriate Specialist Services to assist and give further advice, eg CAHMS, Social Service support such as FAST (Family Support Team).

Carry out observations of the child to see if they are coping better in school. Discuss with class teaches about on-going or any further concerns.

Monitor the impact of any interventions being used by talking with the adults who work with the child.

Talk to parents for their views. Talk to the child for their views.

Discuss with Governors and other staff to determine the best and most effective approach to use for the child.

Communication and Interaction

Types of need and what that could look like Examples of support available in our school How we check it is working

Children and young people who find it difficult to interact with people around them more than most other pupils may demonstrate difficulties with the following;

Talking to other adults and/or children and maintaining eye contact.

Talking about a topic they haven’t chosen to talk about.

Making friends or keeping friends for a long time.

Dealing with changes to the way in which they normally do things eg change to timetables or changes to family plans.

Dealing with noises, smells or other strong sensations around them.

Understanding what other people mean when they are talking to them.

Giving appropriate responses when asked or in discussion.

Teachers adapt what they are teaching or the way they teach to suit the child.

Use of support programmes especially made to help the child build communication and interaction skills.

Use things in the classroom to help the child understand or deal with things that are happening eg visual timetables, social stories.

Seek advice from professional and specialist staff trained in school.

Use of good role models to support social interaction.

Use of friendship circles to support social interaction at playtimes. Use of specialist teacher once children have designated programme following assessment at Speech and Language clinic.

Referrals to specialist outside agencies for advice and support.

Monitor the child’s progress against language targets.

Observations of the child to see if they are communicating or interacting differently.

Talk to parents for their views.

Talk to the child for their views.

Discuss with Governors and other staff to determine the best and most effective approach to use for the child.

Ask for the professional who work with the child to regularly check on the child’s progress by carrying out further assessments and or observations.

Sensory and/or Physical Needs

Types of need and what that could look like Examples of support available in our school How we check it is working

Children who have a disability may find that they find it difficult to manage everyday life without adaptations being made for them. These children may demonstrate the following difficulties;

Hearing what others are saying.

Reading words in books, worksheets, screens and boards.

Moving around without the aid of walking aids or a wheelchair.

Using pencils, scissors, knives and forks that we need to use everyday.

Managing their own basic needs eg taking medication, toileting, getting dressed/undressed.

Poor fine and gross motor skills, eg skipping, jumping, climbing, walking in a straight line.

Seek professional advice form specialist staff eg PIMIS (Physical Impairment Medical Inclusions Service).

Timetabled support for regular physiotherapy sessions if advised by professionals.

Purchase of specialist equipment as advised.

Adaptations to the school physical environment where possible.

Changes made to materials and resources for children eg enlarging text.

Deliver Get Moving programme.

Carry out individual risk assessments for the indoor and outdoor environment and keep staff informed/trained of each child’s difficulties.

Apply for access arrangements for national testing.

Work with the school nurse to create Care Plans.

Use Intimate Care Plans where appropriate.

Regular training and updates on a range of pupils’ needs including annually asthma, epi-pens, epilepsy, diabetes.

Monitor that the child has full access to a broad and varied curriculum and is making at least good progress in this.

Ensure that the child is able to access areas of the school environment easily and as independently as possible eg, toilets, hall/dining area/ playground, own classroom.

Monitor the impact of any interventions being used by talking with and observing the adults who work with the child.

Talk to parents for their views.

Talk to the child for their views.

Discuss with Governors and other staff to determine the best and most effective approach to use for the child.

Ask for the professional who work with the child to regularly check on the child’s progress by carrying out further assessments.

If you have any concerns about your child at any time, then please speak with the Headteacher or Mrs Woodhall - tel: 01384 816910.